MIEN SHAING – Medical Face Reading & Diagnosis – Chinese Face Reading

Know more about the MIEN SHAING – Medical Face Reading & Diagnosis – Chinese Face Reading.

Mien Shaing is a 3000-year-old practice of the people of Chinese origin. It means face(mien) reading(shaing). Through it one can know about anyone’s health, personality, behavior, wealth, and longevity by evaluating their face. Nowadays the art of face reading is becoming more and more popular as it is an efficient way for us to understand others. It has been said that the face records the past, reflects the present and forecasts the future.

MIEN SHAING – Chinese Face Reading

Analyzing a face is a difficult task. One has to look for the size, shape, position of each and every facial feature to read the face accurately. The lines, marks, shading on the face is given equal importance as the features while reading the face. Our faces record everything happened in our lives in the chronological order. Certain things on the face are inherited while others are acquired in the passage of life. The acquired things are the conditions we have gone through and lessons learned. Certain things which are meant to do, and are not done by us on time, then we suffer emotionally, mentally, and physically. These lines of distress can be seen on our faces, so while reading someone’s face accurately these lines are to look for. Each part on our face reveals something about us. Our face is a package of mystery or puzzle which can be solved by reading every part on our face accurately.

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Mein shaing is a practice to evaluate every physical part on the face, not to read the facial expressions. The expressions are something which the people can change every time and put their poker face on. They can easily change the look or expression in a fraction of second to fool others. Whereas the shapes, sizes, markings are permanent and not under anyone’s control. They are the signs of our journey of life till date. This science of reading faces is quite vast. One can take several years to read the faces accurately.

The principles of Mien shaing can help in diagnosing the state of our health. Different parts of our face relate to the health of different organs. The cheeks correlate to lungs, Eyebrows to liver and lips to digestive organs. Facial diagnosis is being taught in various medical universities. The color of the face can help in detecting mineral, vitamins deficiencies. The marks, lines, discoloration give hints about other medical conditions. The location of various spots is also taken into consideration while diagnosis. Location helps to detect when the problems will appear while the size and color of the spot/mark will help to determine the seriousness of the problem. The bigger, thick marks usually hint a major problem.

Face reveals a lot of clues about the health condition. The yellowish facial color indicates low functionality of the liver and spleen. Red hue indicates heart disease, white hue hints low lung function, darkened facial hue indicates low kidney function. The weak immune system can be detected by folding between eyebrows, red spots near the eyebrows indicate recent flu. Reddened eyebrows indicate lack of sleep, reddened nose hints for bladder inflammation or back pain.

Tibetan Medicine

The lips tell about the functionality of the digestive system. A red lip means an overactive stomach. A dark lip indicates a low function of spleen and kidney. Cold sores near lips tells about stomach ulcer. Dark skin around eyes gives clues about the possibility of kidney stones. Black moles between nose and lips can be a sign of high level of acids and toxins in the body. There darkening is a possible sign of cancer. If the region between chin and ears have pox marks, scars, then it is an indication of the low functioning of the intestine.

Conclusion

Many studies are still going on in the medical field regarding Mein shaing and its relevance in the diagnosis. Many kinds of research are yet to come which can be helpful in reading the face more accurately.

This post was last modified on October 4, 2019 9:08 AM

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